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Zaproszenie
do obejrzenia wystaw
„Miasta Dolnego Śląska
na fotografii lotniczej”

Wystawy prezentujemy
na wrocławskim Rynku
oraz w Ratuszu
(Muzeum Miejskie Wrocławia)


Serdecznie zapraszamy!

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Sprawdź swoją wiedzę
o historii Wrocławia
z Radiem RAM
i wydawnictwem
VIA NOVA

Zagadka historyczna w Radiu RAM pojawiać się będzie na 89,8 FM w każdy wtorek koło godz. 16.45.

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26. Wrocławskie Targi Dobrych Książek

30.11 – 3.12.2017

Serdecznie zapraszamy na spotkania autorskie oraz na stoisko nr 50
Hala Stulecia
ul. Wystawowa 1

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Archiwum



Uprooted. How Breslau Became Wrocław During the Century of Expulsions

Author:
Gregor Thum,

17,0 x 24,0 cm, 514 pages,
hardback with a wrapper
versions: English

With the stroke of a pen at the Potsdam Conference following the Allied victory in 1945, Breslau, the largest German city east of Berlin, became the Polish city of Wrocław. Its more than six hundred thousand inhabitants—almost all of them ethnic Germans—were expelled and replaced by Polish settlers from all parts of prewar Poland.

Uprooted examines the long-term psychological and cultural consequences of forced migration in twentieth-century Europe through the experiences of Wrocław’s Polish inhabitants.

In this pioneering work, Gregor Thum tells the story of how the city’s new Polish settlers found themselves in a place that was not only unfamiliar to them but outright repellent given Wrocław’s Prussian-German appearance and the enormous scope of wartime destruction. The immediate consequences were an unstable society, an extremely high crime rate, rapid dilapidation of the building stock, and economic stagnation. This changed only after the city’s authorities and a new intellectual elite provided Wrocław with a Polish founding myth and reshaped the city’s appearance to fit the postwar legend that it was an age-old Polish city. Thum also shows how the end of the Cold War and Poland’s democratization triggered a public debate about Wrocław’s “amputated memory.” Rediscovering the German past, Wrocław’s Poles reinvented their city for the second time since World War II.

Uprooted traces the complex historical process by which Wrocław’s new inhabitants revitalized their city and made it their own.

Contents, part 1
Contents, part 2
Contents, part 3


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